Tag: Washtenaw CTA

Seekers Book Discussion – Why Buddhism Is True

Seekers Book Discussion – Why Buddhism Is True

Why Buddhism Is True by Robert Wright.

Description from amazon.com:

From one of America’s most brilliant writers, a New York Times bestselling journey through psychology, philosophy, and lots of meditation to show how Buddhism holds the key to moral clarity and enduring happiness.

At the heart of Buddhism is a simple claim: The reason we suffer—and the reason we make other people suffer—is that we don’t see the world clearly. At the heart of Buddhist meditative practice is a radical promise: We can learn to see the world, including ourselves, more clearly and so gain a deep and morally valid happiness.

In this “sublime” (The New Yorker), pathbreaking book, Robert Wright shows how taking this promise seriously can change your life—how it can loosen the grip of anxiety, regret, and hatred, and how it can deepen your appreciation of beauty and of other people. He also shows why this transformation works, drawing on the latest in neuroscience and psychology, and armed with an acute understanding of human evolution.

This book is the culmination of a personal journey that began with Wright’s landmark book on evolutionary psychology, The Moral Animal, and deepened as he immersed himself in meditative practice and conversed with some of the world’s most skilled meditators. The result is a story that is “provocative, informative and…deeply rewarding” (The New York Times Book Review), and as entertaining as it is illuminating. Written with the wit, clarity, and grace for which Wright is famous, Why Buddhism Is True lays the foundation for a spiritual life in a secular age and shows how, in a time of technological distraction and social division, we can save ourselves from ourselves, both as individuals and as a species.

 

June Gathering

June Gathering

June 2020 progressive and inclusive community online gathering.

Schedule:

  1. Brief check-in on how we are coping with social distancing, etc. (similar to our candle prayer time when we were able to meet in person)
  2. Each of us (if comfortable doing so) sharing an inspirational reading, prayer, etc.
  3. Dialog discussion ideas:
  • Zach Johnson, executive director of CTA National, says: “we’ll never truly make progress in eliminating poverty unless we reform the   church.  But we can’t begin either project while the church remains European centered, and uses its incredible influence to actively exclude & oppress most of the world’s people: women, LGBTQ, church laborers, & lay people.”
  • According to liberation theologian Jon Sobrino: “there is no salvation outside the poor.”
  • Zach J. also says: “only the poor can reform the church, & only a reformed church will seek to become poor.”  If “churches are places where communities challenge themselves to not just go to the margins, but to become  the margins, then liberation for all people is imaginable, even possible.”

4) Closing thoughts, prayers

May Gathering

May Gathering

May 2020 progressive and inclusive community online gathering.

March Gathering

March Gathering

March 2020 progressive and inclusive community liturgy and meal

Theme: TBA

Please note the following:

==> Bring a dish to pass (First time visitors are exempt)

March 2020 Book Discussion

March 2020 Book Discussion

The Universal Christ: How a Forgotten Reality Can Change Everything We See, Hope For, and Believe” by Richard Rohr.

Description from amazon.com:

In his decades as a globally recognized teacher, Richard Rohr has helped millions realize what is at stake in matters of faith and spirituality. Yet Rohr has never written on the most perennially talked about topic in Christianity: Jesus. Most know who Jesus was, but who was Christ? Is the word simply Jesus’s last name? Too often, Rohr writes, our understandings have been limited by culture, religious debate, and the human tendency to put ourselves at the center.

Drawing on scripture, history, and spiritual practice, Rohr articulates a transformative view of Jesus Christ as a portrait of God’s constant, unfolding work in the world. “God loves things by becoming them,” he writes, and Jesus’s life was meant to declare that humanity has never been separate from God—except by its own negative choice. When we recover this fundamental truth, faith becomes less about proving Jesus was God, and more about learning to recognize the Creator’s presence all around us, and in everyone we meet.

Thought-provoking, practical, and full of deep hope and vision, The Universal Christ is a landmark book from one of our most beloved spiritual writers, and an invitation to contemplate how God liberates and loves all that is.

February Gathering

February Gathering

February 2020 progressive and inclusive community liturgy and meal

Theme: “My Religion is Simple. It is Kindness”

Please note the following:

==> Bring a dish to pass (First time visitors are exempt)

January Gathering

January Gathering

January 2020 progressive and inclusive community liturgy and meal

Theme: “Connecting With the Spirit Deep, Deep Within Us.”

Please note the following:

==> Bring a dish to pass (First time visitors are exempt)

January 2020 Book Discussion

January 2020 Book Discussion

Book – “The Second Mountain: The Quest for a Moral Life ” by David Brooks.

Description from amazon.com:
Every so often, you meet people who radiate joy—who seem to know why they were put on this earth, who glow with a kind of inner light. Life, for these people, has often followed what we might think of as a two-mountain shape. They get out of school, they start a career, and they begin climbing the mountain they thought they were meant to climb. Their goals on this first mountain are the ones our culture endorses: to be a success, to make your mark, to experience personal happiness. But when they get to the top of that mountain, something happens. They look around and find the view . . . unsatisfying. They realize: This wasn’t my mountain after all. There’s another, bigger mountain out there that is actually my mountain.

And so they embark on a new journey. On the second mountain, life moves from self-centered to other-centered. They want the things that are truly worth wanting, not the things other people tell them to want. They embrace a life of interdependence, not independence. They surrender to a life of commitment.

In The Second Mountain, David Brooks explores the four commitments that define a life of meaning and purpose: to a spouse and family, to a vocation, to a philosophy or faith, and to a community. Our personal fulfillment depends on how well we choose and execute these commitments. Brooks looks at a range of people who have lived joyous, committed lives, and who have embraced the necessity and beauty of dependence. He gathers their wisdom on how to choose a partner, how to pick a vocation, how to live out a philosophy, and how we can begin to integrate our commitments into one overriding purpose.

In short, this book is meant to help us all lead more meaningful lives. But it’s also a provocative social commentary. We live in a society, Brooks argues, that celebrates freedom, that tells us to be true to ourselves, at the expense of surrendering to a cause, rooting ourselves in a neighborhood, binding ourselves to others by social solidarity and love. We have taken individualism to the extreme—and in the process we have torn the social fabric in a thousand different ways. The path to repair is through making deeper commitments. In The Second Mountain, Brooks shows what can happen when we put commitment-making at the center of our lives.

December Gathering

December Gathering

December 2019 progressive and inclusive community liturgy and meal

Theme: Peace and Justice for the child.

Please note the following:

==> Bring a dish to pass (First time visitors are exempt)

December 2019 Book Discussion

December 2019 Book Discussion

Book – “The Second Mountain: The Quest for a Moral Life ” by David Brooks.

Description from amazon.com:
Every so often, you meet people who radiate joy—who seem to know why they were put on this earth, who glow with a kind of inner light. Life, for these people, has often followed what we might think of as a two-mountain shape. They get out of school, they start a career, and they begin climbing the mountain they thought they were meant to climb. Their goals on this first mountain are the ones our culture endorses: to be a success, to make your mark, to experience personal happiness. But when they get to the top of that mountain, something happens. They look around and find the view . . . unsatisfying. They realize: This wasn’t my mountain after all. There’s another, bigger mountain out there that is actually my mountain.

And so they embark on a new journey. On the second mountain, life moves from self-centered to other-centered. They want the things that are truly worth wanting, not the things other people tell them to want. They embrace a life of interdependence, not independence. They surrender to a life of commitment.

In The Second Mountain, David Brooks explores the four commitments that define a life of meaning and purpose: to a spouse and family, to a vocation, to a philosophy or faith, and to a community. Our personal fulfillment depends on how well we choose and execute these commitments. Brooks looks at a range of people who have lived joyous, committed lives, and who have embraced the necessity and beauty of dependence. He gathers their wisdom on how to choose a partner, how to pick a vocation, how to live out a philosophy, and how we can begin to integrate our commitments into one overriding purpose.

In short, this book is meant to help us all lead more meaningful lives. But it’s also a provocative social commentary. We live in a society, Brooks argues, that celebrates freedom, that tells us to be true to ourselves, at the expense of surrendering to a cause, rooting ourselves in a neighborhood, binding ourselves to others by social solidarity and love. We have taken individualism to the extreme—and in the process we have torn the social fabric in a thousand different ways. The path to repair is through making deeper commitments. In The Second Mountain, Brooks shows what can happen when we put commitment-making at the center of our lives.